NIGHTLY NOODLE MONTHLY: America's art philosopher

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We’d got our party on pretty hard Saturday night at Oleson Gallery. Sunday, we took time for pink.

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And that’s the word from the Nightly Noodle Monthly!

Highlights From Last Month’s Second Saturday Art Walk in St. Pete

3/8/14

St. Pete, FL

Art Walk Tonight

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Taken by Juliette Inostroza, this portrait of Van Der Luc painting is a real poster-child shot of the life spirit of a St. Pete artist. It was featured in last month’s Oleson Gallery exhibition.

by Eva Avenue

St. Pete’s second Saturday art walk happens downtown, in the Warehouse Arts District and in the neighboring/overlapping Grand Central District, but last month I spent most of my time at the Oleson Gallery, which had some great contemporary pieces, and the other spots East of that down Central.

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This red-mouthed glitter tongue photo by Xina Scuderi, which was in last month’s Oleson Gallery show, is no longer there, but she has some talking-bubble pieces in the new show up right now, which you can get your photo taken with, as I did: 

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There was also this delightfully weird and well-done pink and green painting by Natalie Kuehn

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…which reminded me of Stephen Bush’s paintings, who is from Australia…

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Other than those two artists, I don’t know who else is killin it with the pink and green.

Down the street from Oleson Gallery you’ll find Dysfunctional Grace in its new space at #4 6th Street between Central and 1st Ave. N, which carries animals that have already been taxidermied  and resold or donated elsewhere, and re-appropriates with small accouterments sewn or glued on. Here is tiny Liz, the owner. 

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I asked her if people ever get mad cause of the dead animals, and she was like, “This one lady came in the other day and bitched me out!” And I was like, “Dang, yeah, people like a reason to be angry!” But I think there’s something dishonest about people who get all uppity about death and using dead biomatter in new ways. All paper is dead trees! Canvas and wood is all from dead organic matter as well! All matter gets reused, whether it’s by humans or natural forces. I remember jealous snobs in Chelsea talking down on Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan cause he happens to have some works such as these: 

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The Noodle Interviews Painter Carol Dameron on “Barcelona”

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by Eva Avenue 

Carol’s painting show Barcelona opens with a reception March 8 in St. Petersburg, FL from 5 to 8pm at the Morean Arts Center, which should really be called art center, cause it’s all visual art, but I guess that’s the trend, to be all inclusive all the time of everything. Postmodernism and everything. THE ARTIST WILL GIVE A TALK AT 6PM! 

Since she’s my mom, I started the interview off like—

I always had the idea that having kids really slowed down your art career and for this I’ve always felt guilty. Now be honest—do you ever wish you’d never had kids?

Carol Dameron: Oh my god!! The short answer is no. The truth is I never ever wished that and I always put the kids first and I wanted to! And I’m a much better painter because of the kids.

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How come?

Cause they’re my models and you have good designs and you’re poetic and it made my life richer and I thought it was really helpful. I never accepted the idea you had to stop cause you had kids. I just worked around it. I think it would be really bleak not to have kids and just have this lonely paintbrush. What kind of life is that? I’m not interested in that. I am surprised that you felt guilty cause I don’t feel that all. My friend’s mother was a singer and she also didn’t make it. She’d say to her kids, “You ruined my life. If it wasn’t for you…” But, god! I don’t think it’s that hard to be a reasonable parent. I mean, you gotta hide all that.

What is your favorite thing about painting?

I like colors, I like sloppy goo. It feels like I’m painting with butter when I use oils. I like laying out the palette, the smells, and seeing how the colors work on the palette. I like slopping. I like the different textures when you can have thin washes and little dry swabs and thick strokes and I like it when it works. When it doesn’t work, I can’t stand it. But at this point I’m starting to understand painting.

What do you dislike most about art today?

Oh, I feel that given the world in which we live and the anxiety and the trauma, what I see from a bird’s-eye view is the range of emotion is limited and a lot of the work deals with some level of psychological damage. So what I’m starting to see is several cracks in the surface, I’m seeing the world become round again and there’s a full range of different emotion. Picasso had horror and war and also joy and maternity, maternal feelings; he’d portray all sorts of feelings and I think we’re going back to that.

Actually, I’ve done a painting with a violinist and some dancers called The End of Indifference and I call it that with a nod to the art world. The universal meaning to this painting is this rounding out of emotion that I’m seeing in the art world. It looks to me like the art is becoming more thoughtful. There’s a lot of great art out there. There’s a more complete set of emotions, it feels a little more complete now. Dark and light.

There has always been great art and I also believe a person can be in the corner on the other side of the world and making something that’s so wonderful and we just don’t know about it. You don’t have to be famous to be great but I do think in the end, history chooses rightly. The only mistake history made is forgetfulness. Vermeer and Bach were lost for awhile and then they were found. I don’t think history chooses artists that aren’t great.

Do you treat painting like a 9-5 job?

Yeah—you can’t wait to be inspired. It’s just the work part, the nuts and bolts. You get up and go to your studio and you get your materials today and make your drawing and analyze and make a color study if you need it and get to work. You can’t just lie around waiting for the muse to arrive. You just get up and go. It’s not a question. But one day out of the week I teach a painting class, I teach advanced painting on Wednesdays at the Suntan.

What was the thing you were saying about the personal story set against some universal narrative or whatever?

An allegory is a story with a story behind it, so you’d have a personal story thrown against the backdrop of a universal theme.

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What is exciting about this particular art show at the Morean?

It’s a great place to show work. The people that are there are so great and they have a good eye and they’re so nice and so easy to work with. Working with Amanda and Melissa, they’re so human, just so human and I want all the art world to be like them. I’ve been putting together this work for several years now and working very slowly ’cause the work has a lot of layers to it, lots of complexity and levels to the paintings and they’re large.

The last year I’ve really ramped it up to where I’m working six or seven days a week. I really like that. I worked up until the last minute and plus I have a lot of new drawings. I spent years making sketches for paintings but I have so much basis and training as a drawer—that’s my first thing, really. I love drawing so much and I produced some small drawings of windmills and spaceships which are both ancient and move around with the air.

I’m using the windmill as the symbol of the artist in my work because of the solitude and the heaviness and the turning mills of the mind, which makes sense. I think it would be more of a solitary thing wherever you were. 

If you could live in a city other than St. Pete, which three would you choose?

Well, probably Barcelona, and Vence in the south of France where Chagall lived, and then I’d go to Miami. I’m happy now being in America, and if I had to go anywhere else in America I’d head south cause of the flora and fauna.

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"There are moments in our lives, there are moments in a day, when we seem to see beyond the usual. Such are the moments of our greatest happiness. Such are the moments of our greatest wisdom. If one could but recall his vision by some sort of sign. It was in this hope that the arts were invented. Sign-posts on the way to what may be. Sign-posts toward greater knowledge." ~Robert Henri

On Being Named Nola.

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by Nola Parker

In 1987 I was born and named Nola. I don’t think about this situation very often, only every single time I meet a new person and they say, “What an unusual name, please explain!” Way back when, I asked my parents this same question and they pointed me to their inspiration, Nola Darling, the main character of Spike Lee’s directorial debut She’s Gotta Have It.

I was maybe 13 or 14 and, of course, pranced right off to the video store, innocence still somewhat intact, to rent this movie and investigate my namesake. It was a Clockwork Orange-esque viewing experience, as my friend Karen and I sat frozen through this 84-minute love quadrangle, which features a lot of sex and sex talk. One especially memorable scene has stuck with me, in which Nola and one of her (3) boyfriends have violent (consensual) sex while she cries.  

My experience has no bearing on the objective quality of the film (it’s good!), but it did transfer to my fragile, 13-year-old psyche the idea that I was supposed to be some sort of wild, bohemian sex-addict.   Unfortunately, I love monogamy. I am generally, outside of my own non-sexual weirdnesses, a pretty boring person. And this is who people get when they first meet me, until I tell them my naming story and get very red in the face.  

Recently, at the dentist, I just straight up lied. “I have no idea where it came from,” I told the hygienist through a fluoride mush. I felt really bad about this afterward, like I was betraying the original Nola. This is not the answer. Nola Darling is pretty cool and I could do with a little of her spirit once in a while.

  So, if you are in NOLA right now for Mardi Gras, eat a king cake, embrace your inner Nola, and don’t be ashamed.

And that’s the word from the Nightly Noodle Monthly!

Mystery Library Man Eats Chicken, Defends Humanity

New York. Taken from Humans of New York.

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?"
"Yep."
"Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message."
"What’s that?"
"I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me.”

Someone doesn’t like Moby Dick.

New Orleans

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"Call me Ishmael" is one of the most recognizable opening lines in Western literature. But it’s not fooling everyone.

Moby Dick is the biggest piece of dog doo,” announced artist Aaron Reichert, above. “I have some literary friends, I remember asking them to explain to me the significance of Moby Dick, why it’s so great. I realize I’m basically alone cause everyone agrees it’s one of the greatest books ever written. Certain authors who are my favorite authors cite it as their favorite book. It’s hard for me to just say, ‘OK, I guess it is great.’ I actually didn’t read it, I read half of it, 300 of the 600 pages. I thought fuck this, I’m not...I actually threw it in the garbage. There’s so many other great books.”

He doesn’t like the self-indulgent quality of the book, which he defines as a windbag who doesn’t notice that they’re just talking and talking and nobody cares and everyone’s drained from having to listen.

"It wouldn’t be fair to you if I just went on and on and expected you to listen. That’s my biggest critique of a lot of art, how it unnecessarily goes on and on, I don’t know how to say it exactly, it’s like OK I get it, shut the fuck up. it’s not like I’ve never thought about feelings. The feeling is like they’re being paid by the word, when they’re being indulgent, they overwrite the thing till it’s just bad.”

He also hates Charles Dickens.

"Stuffy dumb-asses."

Ad by John Dameron and Eva Avenue in New Orleans.

Ad by John Dameron and Eva Avenue in New Orleans.

First Time Falling In Love Memory

Vermont.

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Words and painting by Nola Parker

I was seventeen and miserable. I was a high school dropout, my boyfriend had left me, I had zero prospects, and my mother had just died. My life sucked and I was very vocal about it. I spent a lot of time with a good friend of mine, mostly driving around in his dirty white Saab going nowhere.

I didn’t think much about him or anything really because I was too busy being miserable. If you so choose, it is very easy to be miserable in the middle of Winter in Vermont when the snow starts to crust over with dirty street grease and everything becomes dull and gray. One day we drove out to a junk yard so he could get some spare part for the Saab.

We were in the middle of nowhere and he parked on the shoulder of a crummy dirt road, leaving me in the car as he ventured into a sea of rotten, rusted, snow-covered cars. I sat and waited, trying to read the soggy bits of newspaper that had collected on the passenger side floor. It was very cold and he was gone a long time. I had nothing to do but sit there and think about how miserable I was.

I had a lot of reasons to be sad and thus figured the appropriate thing to do was be sad. But I wasn’t sad really. I wanted to be nowhere else but in that car waiting for my friend. Oh! I was in love with him. I kept this a secret forever.

artnet:

Happy Birthday Gerhard Richter! The famed German artist celebrated his 82nd over the weekend. 

artnet:

Happy Birthday Gerhard Richter! The famed German artist celebrated his 82nd over the weekend. 

A Very Brief Breaking News Weekend Update with Eva Avenue.

Thank you for trusting the Noodle for up-to-the-minute news when you need it the least.

 

Ulalume // This is nothing but dreaming
Isabelle Menin

 

Ulalume // This is nothing but dreaming

Isabelle Menin

Obama Art History Rant

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by Eva Avenue

I didn’t want to write this cause I have better things to do and am burned out on writing anyway, but since y’all have wasted everyone’s time with sensationalist inanity like the drooling robot babies you are, I’m doing this for the greater good of humanity.

Remember Obama’s innocuous sentence over which everyone threw themselves into a martyr’s grave? 

“A lot of young people no longer see the trades and skilled manufacturing as a viable career, but I promise you folks can make a lot more potentially with skilled manufacturing or the trades than they might with an art history degree. Now, there’s nothing wrong with an art history degree; I love art history, so I don’t want to get a bunch of e-mails from everybody.”

It’s partly Buzzfeed’s fault for the way they steered public opinion with using the term “snubs art history" in their title.

Because you guys are vapid and depressing, when Obama tried to make a point about how we need skilled laborers, everyone decided to have a meltdown. He doesn’t hate art history, you guys just don’t know how to see things for what they are. He was just illustrating a point about how we need labor workers.

You guys: “Waaah, NOOO, but the indirect point is waaaaaahhhh that he doesn’t respect art history or think art is a job waaaaaahhhh!!”

Fuck. You.

I read the passage to artist Antonia van Omme, who was like, “Wait, why is everyone mad that he said that? No, seriously, I don’t get why everyone’s upset. He’s just saying something really obvious. Everyone knows you can make more money with a skilled trade than with an art history degree. It’s like he’s saying the sky’s blue and everybody’s freaking out.”

It is not in the spirit of the artist to be petty, to latch on to pettiness and drag it out to the middle of town for everyone to see. You are ruining this country. Is that the American spirit? Will this be your legacy, whining like a bitch because you can’t be bothered for one second to screw your drooling robot baby head on and see things for what they are?

I know there’s absolutely no way to spell it out for you people who have blinders on your reasoning and wax in your ears, but it was so obvious that all he was doing was picking a non-manual-labor profession to illustrate his point. Cause that’s how presidents talk – they use examples to illustrate points because they’re appealing to the lowest common denominator. That way everyone can understand.

But did people get that? No. Everyone who ever took an art history class saw the little part where he mentioned art history and decided to take grave personal offense and act like they’d just been crucified in a public hanging.

Oh and then I get an email from Americans for the Arts, all sensationalizing Obama, like OH MY GOD YOU WON’T BELIEVE WHAT THE PRESIDENT SAID!

And then the art-history defenders, which we don’t need, thank you, cause it was never under attack, are like, “Why didn’t he say philosophy degree instead?? Why didn’t he say philosophy instead of art history??”

Oh yeah, good idea. And then a bunch of philosophy majors would be like WAAAAHH CAN YOU BELIEVE OBAMA HATES PHILOSOPHY. PHILOSOPHERS MAKE ALL KINDS OF MONEY, LOOK AT THIS PIE CHART WAAAAAHHH!!!!

You guys are impossible. Seriously, why do you have to be like this? Why do you purposely stretch something so far out of proportion as to completely separate it from its original intention? You know, a real artist doesn’t seek validation, he or she commands his or her own respect through actions and working, through strength of vision. But I guess not everyone wants to be an artist in that way.

So now Americans for the Arts is sending out a petition to let him know how much the creative economy supports the national economy, like he doesn’t already know this; like he hasn’t been privy to a financial breakdown of how the country runs. Whatever. Here, sign it. Go sign it, whatever. Like Obama has anything to do with this anyway. The art jobs are already in place. Go make it happen yourselves, you don’t need Obama for this. 

Seattle has really done a number on Sean!

"2 Sean Alkires of Jenny Invert"